Diving sites - Northern Route
Day 1 - Coco Beach Island Resort

Departure, no diving today.


Day 2 - Pandan Island (Turtle Island)

Close to Pandan Island there are some fantastic rock formations that slope downwards into the abyss. We will see plenty of fish, a great variety of nudibranches and, hopefully, sea turtles that feed along the reef.

The second dive of the day is usually off the north-west coast of the island, where it is possible to see rare species like cabinza grunts and red-toothed triggerfish.
These dives are suitable for all certified divers.


Day 3 - Coron Bay and Dicalabuan

At Coron Bay there is a choice of three different dive spots:

1) Twin Peaks is named after the two limestone formations that break the surface of the water. We descend along one of the rock walls adorned with large gorgonians. Turtles are frequently seen here.
This dive is suitable for Advanced Open Water certified divers or higher.

2) The Pinnacle is home to a great variety of unusual tropical fish. This location offers a good chance to see bamboo sharks or spotted eagle rays.
This dive is suitable for Advanced Open Water certified divers or higher.

3) Barracuda Lake - a unique and highly unusual dive site. It is a deep, volcanic in-land lake where the water temperature increases with depth - roughly 1ºC per metre. The water is clear, but aside from some small colourless fish in the shallower parts, the lake is devoid of aquatic life. However, an ancient old barracuda reportedly lives in the lake, hence the name. The lake is only accessible by climbing over some steep and jagged limestone rocks. Divers are required to carry their own equipment across.
This dive is suitable for all certified divers. Divers must be physically fit.

A second dive of the day will be made at Malaroyroy, a small sandy island located five minutes away from Dicalabuan by boat. Here you will have the chance to experience giant octopuses, turtles, white-tipped reef sharks, blue surgeons and trunkfish. From January to March, manta rays and whale sharks are frequently seen at this location.
This dive is suitable for all certified divers.


Day 4 - Sangat Island and Culion

There is opportunity for three dives today. In Coron Bay, near Sangat Island, a fleet of Japanese war ships was sunk during World War II. We start off with the "Kogyo Maru" or the "Olympia Maru", depending on current and weather conditions. Buoys are attached to the wrecks. This makes for relatively easy diving; however, the current can be strong and visibility is generally only between 5-10 meters.
The freighter, "Kogyo Maru", was sunk on the morning of 24th September 1944 together with ten other Japanese warships. It was carrying materials for construction of an airplane landing strip. It now lies at a depth of 30 m. In one of the cargo holds, a tractor and various construction materials can be seen.
The "Olympia Maru", also a freighter, now stands upright at 27 metres depth. It was carrying oil drums when it was sunk and the barrels are now visible in the cargo holds. The walls between the cargo holds have rusted away, so it is possible to swim from one hold to the next.
These dives are suitable for Advanced Open Water certified divers or higher.

The second dive of the day will be at the freighter "Taiei Maru". The ship now rests on the side. It was hit by three torpedoes that all went through the same hole. The gigantic hole is now visible at 14 metres depth. Inside the ship, the two large engine boilers can be seen. The top side of the wreck is completely overgrown with corals, which attract plenty of crocodile fish.
This dive is suitable for Advanced Open Water certified divers or higher.

For detailed information about the Coron Bay wrecks, visit this website: http://www.coronwrecks.com

In the afternoon, M/Y "Hans Christian Andersen" anchors off Culion Island. Here we will make the third dive of the day. Dynamite Point is the name of the dive site. It is a location where dynamite fishing, now illegal, was once popular. Contrary to what one would think, the place is now a lively, thriving coral reef with lots of beautiful corals, nudibranches, and colourful fish. On rare occasions, guitar rays are seen here.
This dive is suitable for Open Water certified divers or higher.


Day 5 - Calambuyan Island and North Kay

Morning dive at the "Akitsushima" warship wreck. This seaplane carrier ship now rests on the side at 36 metres depth. The structure of the crane that was used to lower the seaplanes onto the water is lying on the sandy bottom and attracts schools of giant batfish and barracudas. One mounting of a 3-barrelled anti-aircraft gun is still present. This is a fascinating dive where you can see giant groupers, schools of barracuda, and yellow fin tuna. Crocodile fish are also frequently encountered.
This dive is suitable for Advanced Open Water certified divers or higher.

After lunch we will make a dive on the "Okikawa Maru", an oil tanker that burned for 14 days before it finally sank at 25 metres depth. The heat produced by the burning oil, caused the bow of the ship to bend upwards. Above deck there is a good chance of spotting turtles, while schools of batfish often swim along the sides of the wreck.
The dive is suitable for Open Water divers, but we recommend Advanced Open Water certification or higher.

At 6 p.m. it is time for a night dive. We will explore North Kay's beautiful coral wall, where we may see octopuses on the hunt and big moray eels leaving their shelters in search off food.
This dive is suitable for Advanced Open Water certified divers or higher.


Day 6 - Dibotonai

Upon arriving at Dibotonai, we will cross to Black Island by boat where we will dive at the remains of the 50 m long "Nanshin Maru". It is a civilian tanker converted to carry special fuels in small isolated tanks for replenishment of land-based depots. The wreck rests upright on a sandy bottom at a maximum depth of 32 m. Visibility here is much better than at the other wrecks, 20-25 m or better is common. Near the wreck you can see plenty of scorpion fish, lion fish, groupers, and bat fish.
This dive is suitable for Advanced Open Water certified divers or higher.

In the afternoon we will make a dive at the northern reef of Dibotonai. If we are lucky, we may encounter the nearly extinct dugong (sea cow), which sometimes comes to graze on the sea grass in the area. A wide variety of crabs, octopuses, surgeon fish and puffer fish inhabit the reef.
This dive is suitable for Open Water certified divers or higher.


Day 7 - Apo Reef

Apo Reef is regarded as one of the world's best diving locations. We will make a total of four dives during the day. You can look forward to some spectacular dives with visibility of up to 40 m or better. The reef begins at five meters depth, descending to approximately 40 m.
On the first dive we will descend to 30-35 m in order to get close to the sharks that hang about on the reef. On all four dives we will have the chance to see both black and white-tipped reef sharks and grey sharks. Between January and April, hammerheads are often encountered. Manta rays are also frequent visitors. We are certain to see sea turtles, as they lay their eggs on Apo Island. Spiny lobsters, barracudas, bumphead parrot fish, several shades of butterfly fish are other sure sightings. Dolphins are often seen from the ship. This is sure to be an unforgettable diving day.

The first and second dives are suitable for Advanced Open Water divers or higher.

The third and fourth dives of the day are suitable for all certified divers.


Note! All dives are planned and made in accordance with the participating divers' level of training and experience. The dive programme is subject to change.
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